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  • Jobs
  • Trees

    Ash (AH)

    A native broadleaved tree with excellent timber properties that is an important host for many species of flora and fauna and consequently of high ecological value. There are currently approximately 151,000 ha of ash in Britain accounting for 11% of all broadleaved woodland (IFOS). Ash is under severe threat from the disease Chalara ash dieback (Hymenoscyphus fraxineus), and its abundance in the British landscape is likely to decrease.  The ability to plant ash is now severely restricted due to concerns over tree health. Ash is a native tree and categorised as a principal tree species. These are tree species where silvicultural knowledge provides confidence to enable successful deployment across Britain. The species are either already widely used or are increasing in usage. They will continue to be important unless affected by a new pest or disease or become adversely affected by climate change.
  • Jobs
  • Publications

    Wood properties and uses of larch in Great Britain

    Lead Author: Paul Mclean
    This report collates and synthesises research into the production and use of larch timber in Great Britain, drawing on information from a range of published and unpublished studies. It is written for forest scientists, engineers, wood processors and end users of wood products who are seeking to determine the potential end uses of larch. The […]
  • Trees

    Sessile oak (SOK)

    Sessile oak and its close relative pedunculate oak are the two native oaks in Britain. Both have iconic status in British culture and have had significant impact on our history particularly the building of the early navies. They are large trees with a substantial impact on the landscape and host to many thousand species of native flora and fauna. Sessile oak is prominent in the west of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland with pedunculate oak dominant in the south, east and central England. The ranges overlap and there is a recognised hybrid between the two species: Quercus x rosacea. The hybrid is widely distributed in Britain and has characteristics of both parents which can cause issues in identification. Sessile oak is a native tree categorised as a Principal tree species. These are tree species where silvicultural knowledge provides confidence to enable successful deployment across Britain. The species are either already widely used or are increasing in usage. They will continue to be important unless affected by a new pest or disease or become adversely affected by climate change.
  • Trees

    Pedunculate oak (POK)

    Pedunculate oak and its close relative sessile oak are the two native oaks in Britain. Both have iconic status in British culture and have had significant impact on our history particularly the building of the early navies. They are large trees with a substantial impact on the landscape and host to many thousand species of native flora and fauna. Pedunculate oak is dominant in the south, east and central England with sessile prominent in the west of England, Wales, Scotland, and Ireland. The ranges overlap and there is a recognised hybrid between the two species: Quercus x rosacea. The hybrid is widely distributed in Britain and has characteristics of both parents which can cause issues in identification. Pedunculate oak is a native tree and categorised as a principal tree species. These are tree species where silvicultural knowledge provides confidence to enable successful deployment across Britain. The species are either already widely used or are increasing in usage. They will continue to be important unless affected by a new pest or disease or become adversely affected by climate change.
  • Research

    Developing a Woodland Water Code

    The design and development of a Woodland Water Code (WWC) to act as a crediting mechanism to encourage private investment in trees for the improvement of the freshwater environment.
  • Research

    Understanding the significance and impacts of different populations of Dothistroma septosporum on native and exotic forest species in Britain

    This research aims to determine whether genetically distinct British populations of the foliar pine pathogen, Dothistroma septosporum are phenotypically different from one another.
  • Trees

    Sycamore (SY)

    The sycamore is a large fast-growing deciduous tree to 30 m+ height with a broad native range.  An early introduction to Britain with discussion ongoing as to when – mid 1500 s or possibly earlier – it is now widely naturalised in northern Europe and Britain. A pioneer species adapted to many site conditions found in mixed stands, small plantations, shelterbelts or as individuals in the wider landscape. In the past a much-maligned species based on its non-native status and ability to regenerate frequently and prolifically where not wanted. There is a growing realisation that Sycamore has several benefits both ecologically and as a species for future forest resilience. It is a species that is here to stay and an important component of our woodland and countryside. Sycamore is categorised as a principal tree species. These are tree species where silvicultural knowledge provides confidence to enable successful deployment across Britain. The species are either already widely used or are increasing in usage.  They will continue to be important unless affected by a new pest or disease or become adversely affected by climate change.
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  • Trees

    Green alder (VAR)

    Green alder is a deciduous shrub or small tree that is widely distributed across the northern temperate forests from north-west America to Japan through Central Europe. There are several recognised sub-species occurring across the range that are geographically distinct. The European species of green alder is Alnus viridis ssp. viridis. It is a light-demanding, fast-growing shrub that grows well on poorer soils. The species is well known for soil enrichment through atmospheric nitrogen fixation, soil stabilisation by forming a highly fibrous system, and for producing abundant leaf litter. The species has been a frequent component in land restoration projects. It has a potential role in upland forests where it will not compete with trees being grown for timber. However, it is unclear whether this role will increase with climate warming. Green alder is categorised as a Plot-stage species.  These are a group of species that have demonstrated some positive silvicultural characteristics at the Specimen-stage and are now subject to further testing and development in a limited number of trial plots.