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Alice Broome

Home Staff Alice Broome

Managing applied research supporting conservation of woodland protected species and development of species guidance for forest policy and management. Delivery of biodiversity conservation agenda in the UK is rapidly changing from single species focus to habitat and ecosystem level research. The protected species programme is maintaining a mix of species focussed research while developing work at the scale of woodland habitats and ecosystems.

Alice Broome joined Forest Research in 1993, where she has specialised in woodland ecology and rare species conservation.

Senior Scientist - Priority species/ habitats
Forest genetics

Forest Research

Northern Research Station

Roslin

Midlothian EH25 9SY

UK

Related Research

Research

PRotect Oak Ecosystems (PuRpOsE)

This project is providing understanding of the current and future health threats to native oaks in the UK. It is focussing on Acute Oak Decline (AOD).

Status current
Themes

Research

Ash dieback impact

This project assesses the potential ecological impact of the disease ash dieback on UK woodlands and species and investigates possible solutions which might be achieved through woodland management.

Status completed
Themes
Woodland structure and birds - effects of woodland management and deer browsing

This project aims to investigate how habitat quality for woodland birds is affected by woodland management and deer browsing by undertaking a large-scale survey of lowland broadleaved woodland in the UK. This will be complemented by a reference survey of upland conifer woodlands where populations of the target bird species have remained more stable.

Protected Species Research

Developing practical management guidance through to strategic advice to support forest policy decisions

Related Publications

Publication

Ecological implications of oak decline in Great Britain

This Research Note describes the ecological value of Great Britain’s native oaks, as reflected in the biodiversity supported by the trees and ecosystem functions the trees perform.

Published

Publication

Niches for species: a multi-species model to guide woodland management

To protect biodiversity in the face of environmental change, there is a need to designate and manage areas of habitat for rare and threatened species. However, to identify the right areas usually requires detailed data on species distributions. Reliable data for rare and protected species are sparse as many species are cryptic and under-recorded. The […]

Published
Ecological impacts of ash dieback and mitigation methods

Ash is a widespread species which makes a substantial contribution to many landscapes. Ash trees are affected by ash dieback, a disease caused by a fungus. It is clear from the European experience of the disease that a significant number of ash trees could be lost from woodlands in the UK over the course of […]

Implications of lowland broadleaved woodland management for the conservation of target bird species

This research consisted of a literature review and field study which investigated woodland management for birds within lowland broadleaved woodlands in Britain. The research considered the effect of woodland management (silvicultural intervention and control of deer browsing) on vegetation structure, and the relationships between vegetation structure and woodland birds. Based on habitat–bird relationships, a classification […]

The implications of upland conifer management for breeding birds

Stand structure is an important determinant of habitat quality for forest biodiversity and is influenced by management. In conifer plantations, the varied structure created within a stand by continuous cover forestry (CCF) systems has been expected to be better for woodland birds than the range of discrete stand structures created through rotations of clearfelling and […]

Understanding the provision of conifer seed for woodland species

Conifer seed provides an important food resource for many woodland mammals, birds and insects, including some of Britain’s rarest species. This Research Note brings together information from a number of sources on cone and seed production by the main conifers planted in Britain. This information can help managers assess the seed resources of their woodlands […]

[Archive] Forests and wood ants in Scotland

This Information Note provides information on the northern wood ant Formica lugubris, the Scottish wood ant Formica aquilonia and the narrow-headed ant Formica exsecta. Information is presented on the legal and conservation status, ecology, habitat requirements and management of these three species. The Note is aimed at a wide range of people with interests in […]

[Archive] Birch in spruce plantations: management for biodiversity

This Technical Paper brings together a series of papers presented at the symposium ‘Birch in spruce plantations: management for biodiversity’ held at Scottish Natural Heritage’s Battleby Conference Centre, Perth, in February 1997. The aim of this symposium was to present the findings from a series of collaborative research projects funded jointly by the Forestry Commission […]

Other Research

Species Action Plan research:

  • Juniper:
    Carrying out field and nursery experiments on propagation and establishment of juniper to provide advice to managers and help meet action plan targets
  • Cone production in conifer forests:
    Collating and interpreting coning data collected by Forest Research to support research on species such as Scottish crossbill and red squirrel
  • Forestry management for chequered skipper and pearl bordered fritillary butterflies:
    Designing and managing habitat monitoring at the Scottish Butterfly Reserve in Lochaber to guide site management and research forest structure and habitat quality
  • Pinewood management for capercaillie and twinflower:
    Investigating the impact of forest management on twinflower survival and on habitat quality for capercaillie
  • Landscape scale habitat management for black grouse:
    Analysing the impact of forest landuse and targeted forest interventions on black grouse populations at two study sites in Scotland
  • Effects of woodland structure on woodland bird populations:
    Assessing  the effects of changes in woodland structure on bird populations as a result of woodland management practices and deer browsing.
  • Protect Oak Ecosystems (PuRpOsE)

Peer reviewed journal articles

Broome, A., Inchboard, L.L., Perks, M., Clarke, T-K., Park, K.J., Thompson, R. Can epiphytic lichens of remnant Atlantic oakwood trees in a planted ancient woodland site survive early stages of woodland restoration? Annals of Forest Science 78, (58), 1-21 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s13595-0 21-01069-w

Mitchell, R.J., Bellamy, P.E., Broome, A., Ellis, C.J. et al (2021) Cumulative impact assessments of multiple hot species loss from plant diseases show disproportionate reductions in associated biodiversity. Journal of Ecology doi: 10.1111/1365-2745.13798

Ray, D., Marchi, M., Rattey, A. and Broome, A. (2021) A multi-data ensemble approach for predicting woodland type distribution: oak woodland in Britain. Ecology and Evolution 11, 9423–9434. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.7752

Broome, A., Bellamy, C., Rattey, A., Ray, D., Quine, C.P., Park, K.J. (2019). Niches for Species, a multi-species model to guide woodland management: An example based on Scotland’s native woodlands. Ecological Indicators 103, 410–424. doi:10.1016/j.ecolind.2019.04.021

Broome, A., Ray, D., Mitchell, R., Harmer, R., (2019) Responding to ash dieback (Hymenoscyphus fraxineus) in the UK: woodland composition and replacement tree species. Forestry 92, 108–119, https://doi.org/10.1093/forestry/cpy040

Broome, A., Long, D., Ward, L.K., Park, K.J., (2017). Promoting natural regeneration for the restoration of Juniperus communis: a synthesis of knowledge and evidence for conservation practitioners. Applied Vegetation Science 20, 397–409. doi:10.1111/avsc.12303

Broome, A., Holl, K. (2017). Can the site conditions required for successful natural regeneration of juniper (Juniperus communis L.) be determined from a single species survey? Plant Ecology and Diversity 10, 175–184. doi:10.1080/17550874.2017.1336186

Mitchell, R.J., A. Broome, J.K. Beaton, P.E. Bellamy, C.J. Ellis, A.J. Hester, N.G. Hodgetts, et al. (2017). Challenges in Assessing the Ecological Impacts of Tree Diseases and Mitigation Measures: The Case of Hymenoscyphus Fraxineus and Fraxinus excelsior. Baltic Forestry 23 (1).

Broome, A. Fuller, R. J., Bellamy, P,  Eichhorn, M P. Gill, R M A, Harmer, R, Kerr, G and Siriwardena, G M, 2017. Implications of lowland broadleaved woodland management for the conservation of target bird species. Forestry Commission Research Note, 28, pp.1–12,  Forestry Commission, Edinburgh.

Broome, A. & Mitchell, R.J., 2017. Ecological impacts of ash dieback and mitigation methods. Forestry Commission Research Note, 29, pp.1–16, Forestry Commission, Edinburgh.

Mitchell, R.J., Hewison, R.L., Hester, A.J., Broome, A., Kirby, K.J. (2016). Potential impacts of the loss of Fraxinus excelsior (Oleaceae) due to ash dieback on woodland vegetation in Great Britain. New Journal of Botany, 6(1), pp.2–15.

Calladine, J., Broome, A. & Fuller, R.J., 2016. The implications of upland conifer management for breeding birds. Forestry Commission Research Note 25, pp.1–6, Forestry Commission, Edinburgh.

Broome, A., Summers, R.W., Vanhala, T. 2016. Understanding the provision of conifer seed for woodland animals. Forestry Commission Research Note 23, Forestry Commission, Edinburgh.

Mitchell, R.J., Pakeman, R.J. Broome, A., Beaton, J. K., Bellamy, E., Brooker, R. W., Ellis, C.J., Hester, A. J. Nick, G., Iason, G.R., Littlewood, N.A., Pozsgai, G., David, R. , Stockan, J.A., Taylor, A.F.S., & Woodward, S.2016. How to Replicate the functions and biodiversity of a threatened tree species? The Case of Fraxinus excelsior in Britain. Ecosystems, (October 2015). Available at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10021-015-9953-y.

Hughes, J. & Broome, A. (2007). Forests and wood ants in Scotland (PDF-2101K). Forestry Commission Information Note 90. Forestry Commission, Edinburgh.

Broome, A., Quine, C., Trout, R., Poulsom E., and Mayle, B. (2005). The link between forest management and the needs of priority species: research in support of the UK Biodiversity Action Plan (PDF-788K). Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2003-2004.

Broome, A. (2003). Growing juniper: propagation and establishment practices. Forestry Commission Information Note 50. Forestry Commission, Edinburgh.

Ray, D. and Broome, A. (2003). Ecological Site Classification – supporting decisions from the stand to the landscape scale (PDF-870K). Forest Research Annual Report and Accounts 2001-2002.

Contract, commissioned and unpublished reports

Fuller, R.J., Bellamy, P.E., Broome, A., Calladine, J., Eichhorn, M.P., Gill, R.M., & Siriwardena, G.M. (2014). Effects of woodland structure on woodland bird populations with particular reference to woodland management and deer browsing (WC0793/CR0485). Defra, London.

Mitchell, R.J., Broome, A., Harmer, R., Beaton, J.K., Bellamy, P.E., Brooker, R.W., Ellis, C.J., Hester, A.J., Hodgetts, N.G., Iason, G.R., Littlewood, N.A., Mackinnon, M., Pakeman, R., Pozsgai, G., Ramsey, S., Ray, D., Riach, D., Stockan, J.A., Taylor, A.F.S., & Woodward, S. (2014). Assessing and addressing the impacts of ash dieback on UK woodlands and trees of conservation importance (Phase 2). Natural England Commissioned Reports, Rep. No. 151. Natural England, Peterborough.

Mitchell, R.J., Bailey, S., Beaton, J.K., Bellamy, P.E., Brooker, R.W., Broome, A., Chetcuti, J., Eaton, S., Ellis, C.J., Farren, J., Gimona, A., Goldberg, E., Hall, J., Harmer, R., Hester, A.J., Hewison, R.L., Hodgetts, N.G., Hooper, R.J., Howe, L., Iason, G.R., Kerr, G., Littlewood, N.A., Morgan, V., Newey, S., Potts, J.M., Pozsgai, G., Ray, D., Sim, D.A., Stockan, J.A., Taylor, A.F.S., & Woodward, S. (2014). The potential ecological impact of ash dieback in the UK, Rep. No. 483. JNCC, Peterborough.

Quine, C., Broome, A., A’Hara, S., & Hover, A. (2013). Trade sector reports – Forestry. In Quantifying the Scale of Trade and Use of Non-Native Species to Support Negotiations on Forthcoming EU Invasive Alien Species Strategy (ed D. Parrott). Defra, London.

Broome, A., Grant, M., Cole, A., & Connolly, T. (2011). Black Grouse Trial Management Project: Monitoring and Analysis outputs for 2010-2011. Report to Scottish Natural Heritage.

Ballantyne, S., Vanhala, T. & Broome, A. (2009). Management trials for natural regeneration of juniper (Juniperus communis subsp communis): findings from 2008. Contract report to Plantlife Scotland as part of Plantlife’s Back from the Brink programme, p 20. Forest Research, Roslin.

Broome, A., Hendry, S., Smith, M., Rayner, W., Nichol, B., Perks, M., Connolly, T., Tene, A., & Bochereau, F. (2008). Investigation of the possible causes of dieback of Glenartney Juniper Wood SAC Perthshire. Project No: 18895. Report commissioned by Scottish Natural Heritage. Forest Research, Roslin.

Broome, A., A’Hara, S., & Cottrell, J. (2008). Twinflower Conservation: development of microsatelite markers. Unpublished report to Cairngorms National Park and Plantlife Scotland. Forest Research, Roslin.

Broome, A. (2007). Monitoring results from 5 management trials for natural regeneration of juniper (Juniperus communis subsp communis).  Contract report to Plantlife Scotland as part of Plantlife’s Back from the Brink programme. Forest Research, Roslin.

Broome, A., Poulsom, E., & Quine, C. (2007). F2 Monitoring task 3 – Monitoring to measure the benefits of habitat management. In Urgent Conservation Management for Scottish Capercaillie, Final Technical Report. Project No. LIFE2002 NAT/UK/8541 (ed J. Dunsmore). Highland Birchwoods, Munlochy.

Tene, A., Broome, A., & Connolly, T. (2007). Investigation of the possible causes of dieback of Glenartney Juniper Wood SAC Perthshire. Project No: 18895.  Part 1: age structure analysis. Report commissioned by Scottish Natural Heritage. Forest Research, Roslin.

Poulsom, E., Griffiths, M., Broome, A., and Mayle, B. (2004) Identification of priority woodlands for red squirrel conservation in North and Central Scotland.  Scottish Natural Heritage, Edinburgh.

Drane, A. B and Broome A. (2003). The current status, distribution and conservation of the scarce lime bark beetle, Ernoporus tiliae (Panzer), including a review of Ernoporicus caucasicus (Lindemann), in England: implementing the UK Biodiversity Action Plan. Edinburgh, Forestry Commission Internal Report.

Ray, D., Humphrey, J. Poulsom, L. & Broome, A. (2001). Clashindarroch Project: Site evaluation and design plan for new native woodland. Report to Scottish Forestry Alliance.

Broome, A. C. & J. Clare, et al. (2000). Using an Ecological Site Classification at the landscape scale to guide the restoration of Atlantic Oakwoods within the Ben Lomond National Memorial Park. EU Life 97 Contract- Restoration of Atlantic Oakwoods.

Broome, A. (1999). Review of Species Action Plan Research Needs for the Forestry Commission – Executive summary. Internal report.

Broome, A. & Sterling, M. (1999). Review of research needs for the Forestry Commission for the species and habitat action plans. Draft internal report.

Broome, A. &  Milner, A.  (1998). An evaluation of the cost of grey squirrel bark-stripping damage in British woodlands: a review of Woodland Ecology Branch damage assessments and grey squirrel control data sets. Draft internal report.

Broome, A. & Ray, D. (1997). Cause-effect relationships for pollutant inputs to UK woodlands. Draft internal report.

Papers

Broome, A. & Holl, K., 2017. Can the site conditions required for successful natural regeneration of juniper ( Juniperus communis L.) be determined from a single species survey? Plant Ecology & Diversity, in press. DOI: 10.1080/17550874.2017.1336186.

Broome, A. Long, D., Ward, L.K., Park, K J.  2017. Promoting natural regeneration for the restoration of Juniperus communis : a synthesis of knowledge and evidence for conservation practitioners. Applied Vegetation Science, 20(3), pp.397–409.

Mitchell, R.J., Broome, A., Beaton, J.K., Bellamy, P.E., Ellis, C.J., Hester, A.J., Hodgetts, N.G., Iason, G.R., Littlewood, N.A., Newey, S., Pozsgai, G., Ramsay, S., Riach, D., Stockan, J.A., Taylor, A.F.S. and Woodward, S.2016. Challenges in Assessing the Ecological Impacts of Tree Diseases and Mitigation Measures: the Case of Hymenoscyphus fraxineus and Fraxinus excelsior. Baltic Forestry 23(1): 116-140.

Mitchell, R.J., Hewison, R.L., Hester, A.J., Broome, A., Kirby, K.J. 2016. Potential impacts of the loss of Fraxinus excelsior (Oleaceae) due to ash dieback on woodland vegetation in Great Britain. New Journal of Botany, 6(1), pp.2–15.

Mitchell, R.J., Pakeman, R.J. Broome, A., Beaton, J. K., Bellamy, E., Brooker, R. W.,  Ellis, C.J., Hester, A. J. Nick, G., Iason, G.R., Littlewood, N.A., Pozsgai, G., David, R. , Stockan, J.A., Taylor, A.F.S., & Woodward, S.2016. How to Replicate the Functions and Biodiversity of a Threatened Tree Species ? The Case of Fraxinus excelsior in Britain. Ecosystems, (October 2015).

Calladine, J., Bray, J., Broome, A. & Fuller, R.J. (2015) Comparison of breeding bird assemblages in conifer plantations managed by continuous cover forestry and clearfelling. Forest Ecology and Management 344, 20-29.

Leveque, J., Marzano, M., Broome, A., Connolly, T., & Dandy, N. (2015) Forest visitor perceptions of recreational impacts on amphibian wildlife. European Journal of Wildlife Research, 61.

Broome, A., Mitchell, R., & Harmer, R. (2014) Ash dieback and biodiversity loss: can management make broadleaved woodlands more resilient? Quarterly Journal of Forestry 108, 241-248.

Mitchell, R.J., Beaton, J.K., Bellamy, P.E., Broome, A., Chetcuti, J., Eaton, S., Ellis, C.J., Gimona, A., Harmer, R., Hester, A.J., Hewison, R.L., Hodgetts, N.G., Iason, G.R., Kerr, G., Littlewood, N.A., Newey, S., Potts, J.M., Pozsgai, G., Ray, D., Sim, D.A., Stockan, J.A., Taylor, A.F.S. & Woodward, S. (2014) Ash dieback in the UK: A review of the ecological and conservation implications and potential management options. Biological Conservation, 175, 95-109.

Broome, A., Quine, C.P., & Connolly, T. (2014) An evaluation of thinning to improve habitat for capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus). Forest Ecology and Management, 314 94-103.

A’Hara, S.W., Amouroux, P., Argo, E.E., Avand-Faghih, Barat, A.A., Barbieri, L., Bert, T.M., Blatrix, R., Blin, A., Bouktila, D., Broome, A., […] Zhang, Y.X.(2011). Permanent Genetic Resources added to Molecular Ecology Resources Database 1 August 2011-30 September 2011 Molecular Ecology Resources. doi: 10.1111/j.1755-0998.2011.03088.x

Broome, A., Clarke, S., Peace, A., & Parsons, M. (2011). The effect of coppice management on moth assemblages in an English woodland. Biodiversity and Conservation, 20, 729–749.

Mayle, B. & Broome, A. (2011). Changes in the impact and control of the grey squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) as determined from regional surveys in Great Britain. In 8th European Vertebrate Pest Management Conference  26-30 September 2011 (eds J. Jacob & A. Esther), Vol. 432. Julius Kühn-Institut, Berlin, Germany.

Dalrymple, S.E. & Broome, A. (2010). The importance of donor population identity and habitat type when creating new populations of small cow-wheat Melampyrum sylvaticum from seed in Perthshire, Scotland. Conservation Evidence, 7, 1-8

Dalrymple, S.E., Broome, A. & Gallagher, P. (2008). Re-introduction of small cow wheat into the Scottish Highlands, UK. . In GLOBAL RE-INTRODUCTION PERSPECTIVES: re-introduction case studies from around the globe. (ed P.S. Soorae). IUCN/SSC Re-introduction Specialist Group, Abu Dhabi, UAE.

Broome, A., Hendry, S., & Peace, A.  (2007).  Annual and spatial variation in coning shown by the Forest Condition Monitoring Programme data for Norway Spruce, Sitka spruce, and Scots pine in Britain.  Forestry, 80, 17-28.

Ray, D., & Broome, A.  (2007).  An information retrieval system to support management of Habitats and Rare Priority and Protected Species (HaRPPS) in Britain.  In Sustainable Forestry: from Monitoring and Modelling to Knowledge Management and Policy Science (eds K. Reynolds, A. Thomson, M. Kớhl, M. Shannon, D. Ray & K. Rennolls).  CAB International, Wallingford, UK.

Ray, D., Broome, A., Brunt, A., Brown, T., & Vials, C.  (2007).  An information system to support sustainable management of Habitats and Rare Priority and Protected Species (HaRPPS) in British forests.  In Sustainable Forestry in Theory and Practice (ed).  USDA Forest Service, Corvalis, US. ISBN 978-0-9789478-0-4, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK (ed K.M. Reynolds).

Broome, A. (2007). Management of butterfly habitat in north west Scotland: the effects of five years of cattle grazing. Aspects of Applied Biology 82, 199-212.

Broome, A. & Poulsom, E. (2006). Validation of Forest Condition Monitoring Programme (ICP Forests, Level 1) cone index scores by measuring cone density using field of view method. Forestry, 70, 159-166.

Ferris, R., Peace, A.J., Humphrey, J.W. and Broome, A. (2000). Relationships between vegetation, site type and stand structure in coniferous plantations in Britain, Forest Ecology and Management (136) 1-3 pp. 35-51.