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3909 Search Results

  • Trees

    Cider gum (EGU)

    Cider gum was introduced into Britain over 150 years ago and is now a common ornamental often dominating small gardens in urban areas. It has been widely trialled and a number of forest plots survive in lowland and coastal areas of Britain. Probably the safest eucalypt species to plant in Britain at the present time and the potential range is likely to expand with climate warming. One of the hardiest eucalypts along with the snow gums (E. pauciflora spp.) but has been little planted despite demonstrating potential for high productivity. Like all eucalypts there is no resting bud so cold tolerance relies on hardening-off in the autumn and this leaves them vulnerable to unseasonal frosts and occasional severe winters. Cider gum is categorised as a secondary tree species.  These are species that have demonstrated positive silvicultural characteristics in trial plots but gaps in knowledge constrain wider use. The species are being actively evaluated to increase understanding and inform future deployment.
  • Trees

    Cedar-of-Lebanon (LCR)

    This Mediterranean cedar has long been valued for its fine timber and impressive stature and has been used from antiquity. While natural stands are now very fragmented, it is increasingly planted in Turkey and in many trials elsewhere including in the UK where its performance is being assessed. Earliest known introduction to Britain is 1638, and the original tree near Wantage is still thriving indicating long life and tolerance of conditions as do the numerous ornamental specimens in parks and gardens, many dating back to the 18th Century. In the UK, cedar-of-Lebanon has the potential for wider use as the climate warms. It could become a valuable addition to the suite of species for lowland planting in southern Britain, particularly where soils are neutral to calcareous. Cedar-of -Lebanon is listed as Vulnerable by the IUCN. Cedar-of-Lebanon is categorised as a plot-stage species. These are a group of species that have demonstrated some positive silvicultural characteristics at the Specimen-stage and are now subject to further testing and development in a limited number of trial plots.
  • Trees

    Beech (BE)

    Beech is a well-known timber tree famed for use in furniture but is struggling to find favour for wider use. The potential vulnerability of beech to drought may limit future use in parts of southern and eastern Britain. Further research is required to evaluate its full climatic limitations. The warming climate may see greater productivity on suitable sites in northern Britain. Beech is a native tree and categorised as a principal tree species. These are species where silvicultural knowledge provides confidence to enable successful deployment across Britain. The species are either already widely used or are increasing in usage. They will continue to be important unless affected by a new pest or disease or become adversely affected by climate change.
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  • Trees

    Western red cedar (RC)

    Western red-cedar is a fast-growing, non-native conifer that produces timber with good wood properties. One of several species sometimes called ‘Arbor vitae‘ (Latin: tree of life) occurring in the USA and Asia.  Western red-cedar has been the most reliable species in British trials. Although not widely planted there is growing recognition it has a place in forest diversification and is consequently being more widely used. Western red-cedar is categorised as a Principal tree species. These are tree species where silvicultural knowledge provides confidence to enable successful deployment across Britain. The species are either already widely used or are increasing in usage.  They will continue to be important unless affected by a new pest or disease or become adversely affected by climate change.
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  • Research

    Understanding the public value of Trees outside Woodlands: Peri-Urban and Rural (ToWPUR)

    This project will gather evidence to better understand the social and cultural value of an understudied part of English treescapes: Trees outside Woodlands in peri-urban and rural areas (ToWPUR). The research will feed into a variety of policy aims relating to the societal benefits and impact of tree-planting and management.
  • Research

    Feel Good in the Forest: Social prescribing pilot project evaluation

    Feel Good in the Forest is a social prescribing pilot project run by Forestry England. It is part of a wider programme called Active Forests. The pilot aimed to address barriers to participation in forest-based activities and engage inactive and fairly active people with mild to moderate health conditions.
  • Publications

    Green Finance in the Context of Trees, Woods and Forests

    Lead Author: Wen Hao Low
    This research examines the applications of green finance to trees, woods, and forests (TWF) in the UK, focusing on innovative financing mechanisms. It investigates how green finance is defined and identifies financial mechanisms that have the potential to increase private investment into the country’s TWF.
  • Trees

    Black walnut (BWA)

    Black walnut (Juglans nigra), also called eastern black walnut and American walnut, is a highly valued tree in the Eastern USA. Found in mixed forests often as small groves on deep rich soils. The attractive, fine, straight-grained dark wood has been sought after and consequently many of the best trees in its native range have been felled. Cultivated since the mid 1600s in central Europe it has had little attention in Britain primarily due to climatic limitations. With a warming climate and its potential as a high value timber tree it could offer a place as an alternative to ash on good sites. The additional value of edible nuts could also see this species considered for agroforestry planting. Black walnut is categorised as a secondary tree species.  These are species that have demonstrated positive silvicultural characteristics in trial plots, but gaps in our knowledge constrain their wider use. The species is being actively evaluated to increase understanding and inform future deployment.